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Aged Care Books

A Loving Approach to Dementia Care

A Loving Approach to Dementia Care

For many caregivers caring for a person living with Alzheimers' and other dementias day in and day out can be a frustrating and lonely experience. Most carers have little or no training in the art of dementia care and can struggle with the job or burden of constant caregiving.

A loving Approach to Dementia Care

Understanding Behaviour in Dementia that Challenges

Understanding Behaviour in Dementia that Challenges

Many health professionals and carers find managing challenging behaviours associated with dementia difficult. This book helps health professionals, nurses and carers recognise and manage challenging behaviours.

Understanding Behaviour in Dementia that Challenges

The Creative Arts in Dementia Care

Health professionals and caregivers are now recognising the value art and creativity when caring for someone living with dementia. Creativity and the expression of self is becoming an important tool for delivering person centred care.

The Creative Arts in Dementia Care

Comforting Touch in Dementia and End of Life Care

This book gives nurses and caregivers the opportunity to learn the powerful effect of hand massage. Gentle touch therapy is a simple and meaningful way carers can connect and bring comfort to a person with dementia or those at the end of life.

Comforting Touch in Dementia and End of Life Care

Clinical Manual of Alzheimer Disease and Other Dementias

'The Clinical Manual of Alzheimer Disease and Other Dementias edited by Drs. Weiner and Lipton offers the busy professional a concise orientation to the care of patients and families facing the challenge of dementia.

Clinical Manual of Alzheimer Disease and Other Dementias

Caring for Somebody with Dementia

Nobody expects their parent to get dementia.  Nobody is prepared for it.  But for Merideth, her mother did get dementia and for the next three years she became her full time carer.
 
Caring for Somebody with Dementia describes the experiences of life with dementia over those three years.
 
For all that time Dementia sat himself between Merideth and her mother – or at least he tried to.
Caring for someone with dementia - Meredith Sindel

The Activity Year Book

Engagement in meaningful activity is an important aspect of human existence, regardless of one's cognitive abilities. Even in the later stages of dementia, people can still be engaged in activities at a level that allows them to be successful. In fact in these later stages, where cognitive abilities may be waning, the need for activity becomes greater, as cognitive stimulation helps preserve what skills remain. To view or purchase this book see www.footprint.com.au

The Activity Year Book

Providing good care at night for older people

The experiences and needs of residents and patients in nursing and care homes are very different at night, and this is particularly true for those with dementia. Yet nursing and care homes are not always inspected with the same rigour at night as they are during the day, and night staff do not always receive the same levels of training, resources and supervision as day staff. 

Providing care for older people at night

Hearing the Person with Dementia

Losing the ability to communicate can be a frustrating and difficult experience for people with dementia, their families and carers. As the illness progresses, the person with dementia may find it increasingly difficult to express themselves clearly, and to understand what others say.

Hearing the person with dementia

They're Your Parents too! How Siblings Can Survive Their Parents Aging Without Driving Each Other crazy

Your parents are growing older and are getting forgetful, starting to slow down, or worse. Suddenly you find yourself at the cusp of one of the most important transitions in your life—and the life of your family.

Your parents need you and your siblings to step up and take care of them, a little or a lot. To make the right things happen, you will all need to work together. And yet your siblings may have very different ideas from yours of what’s best for Mom and Dad.

Disclaimer: This site is for information purposes only and should not be used to diagnose or treat a health problem, nor as a substitute for professional advice with a qualified health professional or doctor.

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